Here’s a fun Easter activity for kids – build a LEGO® Resurrection Garden! I love the beautiful Resurrection Garden ideas online that use real rocks and grass to create a table centerpiece with a scene of the cross and the empty tomb. This isn’t quite the same, but I was honestly surprised at how pretty our LEGO® version looked when it was finished!

Build a LEGO Resurrection Garden

I had wanted to build figures without faces the way I did for our LEGO nativity, but the scale did not work out very well – the tomb would have had to be huge. We chose to use a couple of minifigure knights to guard the tomb, but beyond that we didn’t use any people. I didn’t want the distraction of trying to make some type of character into a figure for Jesus or the disciples. I think it worked out well, but of course you are welcome to use more mini figures in your version if you prefer!

LEGO Resurrection Garden

Here is a close-up of the tomb:

LEGO Resurrection Garden

And the stone:

LEGO Resurrection Garden

The hill is hollow, so it was a little tricky to get the tan plates on the top without collapsing the entire thing… but we did it!

The crosses are 1 x 1 bricks, then a 1 x 6 plate, then a 1 x 2 plate with one stud on top. That allows you to center more 1 x 1 bricks on top.

LEGO Resurrection Garden

Here’s a view of the whole thing from the above:

LEGO Resurrection Garden

It looks great displayed on the table!

Build a LEGO Resurrection Garden

If you build one, we’d love for you to post a picture on the Frugal Fun for Boys Facebook page! (And not just boys, of course!)

For more Christ-centered Easter ideas, check out our Wooden Resurrection Eggs and our post on Telling the Easter Story with a Salt Dough Mountain.

LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO® group of companies which does not sponsor, authorize, or endorse this site.

Build a LEGO Resurrection Garden

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  1. Happy Home Fairy Mar 11, 2016

    I LOVE THIS!!!

    Reply
    1. Stacey Mar 20, 2016

      We are doing this! Great idea.

      Reply
      1. Gwen Meyer Mar 22, 2017

        Love this. We plant a garden but I'm using this for our table.

        Reply
        1. Sally Martin Apr 20, 2019

          I was excited to se this... only to realize that there were no instructions or supply list...It didn't look that difficult, even since this is last minute, but I would at the very least, need a supply list in order to know if I have the necessary bricks.....I will have to postpone this until I can sit down for an afternoon & figure out how to do it & what I need to buy.

          Reply
          1. Julie Jun 28, 2019

            For your crosses, how did you center a 1x6 plate on top of a 1x1 brick? I end up with 2 studs on one arm of the cross, then the 1x1 brick and then 3 studs on the opposite arm of the cross. Also, my plate with just one stud on top can’t be centered over a 1x1 brick; it needs to fit onto a 1x2 brick (and then the 1 stud on top is centered between the 2 studs on the lower brick it’s attached to). I love this scene and want to use a version of it at our church’s Easter Fair next year but need to make sure it’s do-able first! ?

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            1. Sarah Jun 29, 2019

              Well, that ended up being a nice little puzzle to solve, ha ha! Since this post was a few years ago, I could not remember what we had done. In order to center the 1 x 6 plate on top of a 1 x 1 brick, the brick needs to have an open stud. However, digging through our bricks, none of our 1 x 1 bricks seem to have an open stud. Brick Link shows that there was a 1 x 1 x 5 (five studs tall) brick that had an open stud, but that was discontinued in 2011. Most of our LEGO bricks were purchased after that, so I really don't know what we used! One easy solution would be to use 1 x 1 round bricks, which have an open stud. Here's the part on Brick Link: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=3062b#T=C

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